Health benefits of probiotics for PCOS

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Wondering if you should take a probiotic for PCOS? Here’s what to know about the benefits of probiotics and how they can help PCOS.

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Best Beverages for PCOS

Tired of drinking plain old water? Here’s our picks for the best beverages to drink if you have PCOS.

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PCOS, Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals and Fertility

Lifestyle modifications are the primary treatment approaches for people with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). These lifestyle modifications include nutrition, supplements, and physical activity as well as stress management and sleep hygiene. When I provide nutrition counseling to patients with PCOS, we discuss these important lifestyle changes as well as ways to reduce exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs).

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PCOS and ADHD: An Increased Risk in Children?

Emerging research has shown a link between PCOS and attention deficit hyperactivity (ADHD) in children. This article reviews the research findings and discusses possible causes.

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What Exercise is Best for PCOS: Cardio vs Weight Training?

Cardio and weight training are two popular forms of exercise. Many women want to know if they should follow cardio only workouts or weight training for PCOS. I frequently get a sked questions like “If I lift weights, won’t I get bulky?”, “My goal is to lose weight, so isn’t cardio best?” In this post, you will find out whether cardio or weight training is best for PCOS. We will first look at the differences between these exercises, the benefits for PCOS and which you should favour as your PCOS exercise. So, if you want to learn the truth about these popular forms of exercise and finally find a workout you can stick to, keep reading. The answer may surprise you!

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1 in 4 Women Living with Type 1 Diabetes has PCOS

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is possibly the most frequent undiagnosed comorbidity found in type 1 diabetes (T1D). PCOS affects 1 in 10 women but it’s roughly 2.5 times higher in the type 1 diabetic population. PCOS is estimated to affect 19-41% of reproductive age women living with T1D.Here’s what you need to know.

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